Saizen

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Genotropin, Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, Saizen, Serostim, Zorbtive, |Saizen

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Saizen

Generic Name: somatropin (soe ma TROE pin)
Brand Names: Genotropin, Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, Saizen, Serostim, Zorbtive

What is somatropin?

Somatropin is a form of human growth hormone. Human growth hormone is important in the body for the growth of bones and muscles.

Somatropin is used to treat growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, and in those with chronic kidney failure, Turner syndrome, and other causes. Somatropin is also used to prevent severe weight loss in people with AIDS, or to treat short bowel syndrome.

Somatropin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about somatropin?

If you use a steroid or any medicine to treat diabetes, your doses may need to be changed when you start using somatropin. Do not stop using or change the dose of your steroid or diabetes medication without your doctor"s advice.

If you are using somatropin to treat short bowel syndrome, it is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. Somatropin is not a cure for short bowel syndrome.

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome and are using somatropin, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring.

Call your doctor at once if you have sudden and severe pain or tenderness in your upper stomach, with nausea, vomiting, sweating, fever, fast heartbeat, and yellowing of the skin or eyes. You should also call your doctor promptly if you have vision changes and sudden, severe pain behind your eyes.

How you store this medicine will depend on what brand you are using and what diluent (liquid) you are mixing somatropin with. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with your medicine about proper storage of somatropin before and after it has been mixed.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using somatropin?

Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a growth hormone medicine, or to drug perservatives such as benzyl alcohol, metacresol or glycerin.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to somatropin, or if you have:
  • diabetic retinopathy (a serious eye condition caused by diabetes);

  • cancer; or

  • Prader-Willi syndrome and are also overweight or have sleep apnea or severe respiratory (lung) problems.

You should also not use somatropin if you have a serious medical condition after having:

  • open heart surgery or stomach surgery;

  • trauma or other medical emergency; or

  • breathing problems (such as lung failure).

Before using somatropin, tell your doctor if you have:

  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • diabetes;

  • scoliosis;

  • high blood pressure (hypertension);

  • a pancreas disorder;

  • cancer (past or present);

  • carpal tunnel syndrome;

  • underactive thyroid; or

  • a brain tumor or lesion.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use somatropin, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether somatropin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use somatropin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use somatropin?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose of this medicine and how often you give it will depend on what you are being treated for.

Somatropin is given as an injection under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be given instructions on how to inject your medicine at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and syringes used in giving the medicine.

Your doctor or nurse will show you several areas on your body where you can inject somatropin. Use a different injection place each time you give yourself the shot. Do not inject this medicine into skin or muscle that is red, sore, infected, or injured.

Do not shake the medication vial (bottle). Vigorous shaking can ruin the medicine. When mixing somatropin with a diluent (liquid), use a gentle swirling motion. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or is cloudy. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use each needle and syringe only one time. With your medicine you will receive a puncture-proof container for used needles and syringes. If you do not receive a container, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets. Your pharmacist can tell you how to properly dispose of the container.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harm, your blood and growth progress will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your eyes may also need to be checked. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

If you are being treated for short bowel syndrome, follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor to help control your condition. Somatropin is not a cure for short bowel syndrome.

If you use a form of somatropin that comes in a cartridge for use with an injection pen, use only the pen injection system provided with the somatropin brand you use.

How you store this medicine will depend on what brand you are using and what diluent you are mixing somatropin with. After mixing somatropin, you may need to use it right away or you may be able to store it for later use. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with your medicine about proper storage of somatropin before and after it has been mixed. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about proper storage of your medication.

Throw away any somatropin left over after the expiration date on the label has passed.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medication as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than 3 doses in a row.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a somatropin overdose may include tremors or shaking, cold sweats, increased hunger, headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, and nausea. Symptoms of long-term overdosage may include excessive growth.

What should I avoid while using somatropin?

If you use Zorbtive to treat short bowel syndrome, avoid drinking fruit juices or soda beverages. Follow the instructions of your doctor or nutrition counselor about what types of liquids you should drink while using Zorbtive.

Avoid drinking alcohol if you have short bowel syndrome. Alcohol can irritate your stomach and could make your condition worse.

Somatropin side effects

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring. Rare cases of serious breathing problems have occurred in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use somatropin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • sudden and severe pain or tenderness in your upper stomach;

  • nausea, vomiting, sweating, fever, fast heartbeat, yellowing of the skin or eyes;

  • increased thirst and urination;

  • sudden and severe pain behind your eyes, vision changes;

  • swelling in your head, face, hands, or feet; or

  • numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers.

Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

  • headache;

  • redness, soreness, swelling, skin rash, itching, pain, or bruising where the medicine was injected;

  • breast swelling;

  • joint pain, swelling, or stiffness; or

  • mild nausea, stomach pain, gas.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect somatropin?

Before using somatropin, tell your doctor if you use insulin or take oral (by mouth) medicine to treat diabetes. Somatropin may affect blood sugar levels and you may need to adjust your dose of the diabetes medication. Oral diabetes medicines include acetohexamide (Dymelor), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase), tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide (Orinase). Do not change the dose of your diabetes medication without your doctor"s advice.

Tell your doctor if you use any type of steroid medicine such as cortisone (Cortef, Cortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred), and dexamethasone (Decadron). Steroids can make somatropin less effective and your doses may need to be adjusted. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly. Follow your doctor"s instructions.

There may be other drugs that can affect somatropin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has information about somatropin written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Somatropin is available with a prescription under the brand names Genotropin, Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, Saizen, Serostim, and Zorbtive. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ("Multum") is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum"s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum"s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 6.03. Revision Date: 04/12/2007 11:02:30 AM.




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